Alberta Landlords Association


Welcome to the ALA for Small Business Landlords

The Alberta Landlords Association (ALA) and its sister organization The Canada Landlords Association (CLA) are leading provincial and national organizations for private small residential landlords. We provide a unified voice for private landlords and promote and protect landlord interests to national and local government.

  • Network with top professionals
  • Get advice from experienced landlords
  • Learn how the Landlord and Tenant Board works
  • Meet our recommended partners
  • Take part in landlord activities, social events.
  • A chance to "get involved!"

Alberta Landlords Are Facing Challenges In 2021…But Also Opportunities!

Alberta Landlords have had a very challenging 2020

With the Covid pandemic many tenants couldn’t (or just didn’t) pay rent and this led to financial stress on many of us. Despite some help from the province, many did not collect full rent and others faced late rent regularly.

Rent Increase

Unlike other provinces such as Ontario and BC, Alberta landlords can still raise the rent in 2021.

Small Alberta landlords know how our costs are rising and how important it is to increase the rent to try to cover your costs.

 

Opportunities in 2021

Experienced and successful Alberta landlords know there will also be opportunities in 2021.

When the economy gets stronger there will be more people coming to our province to work. These more qualified tenants will be on the way and looking for great rentals.

Students will also be returning. This will lead to a very strong rebound in the student rental sector.

Tenant Screening

Make sure you continue to screen your potential renters carefully. This should include references, employment proof and a credit check.

You can join the Alberta Landlords Association and begin running credit checks for under $10/check.

Alberta Landlords Face Challenges And Opportunities in 2021

Make sure you take advantage of the opportunities and make sure you screen all potential tenants with a credit check.

Run Credit Checks For Only $9.95/Check (With Scores)

You Can Join the Alberta Landlords Association for a Low One-Time Registration Fee and Start Running Premium Credit Checks for Only $9.95/Check To Find Great Tenants! 

With the current crisis going on it’s more important than ever for landlords to carefully screen your tenants. This always includes running a credit check to make sure your potential renters have a history of paying their bills.

When you join our landlord community you get multiple tools for you to succeed during good times and bad. For over a decade the Alberta Landlords Association has been helping small landlords succeed and getting our voice heard at last.

We also want to help tenants and want to have great communication between parties and a “win win” approach. The is why we have our Pay Your Rent Campaign where we encourage tenants to cooperate with their landlord.

Make Sure A Credit Check For $9.95 Is Part Of Your Screening Process

We were the first organization to promote credit checks for small landlords in Canada. We started this over a decade ago! Our partners are very reputable and you can run a check for only less than ten dollars!

There Are Lots Of Great Tenants Out There Looking For a Great Landlord

Make sure running a credit check is part of your screening. And only for $9.95/check!

A Long Term Successful Alberta Landlord Gives Advice

A Landlord Who Has Owned Rentals Since the 1980’s Speaks Out

Thank you ALA for agreeing to post my message “edit free” so I can talk “real talk” about my experiences as a long term landlord/investor who is now a millionaire thanks to owning residential rentals.

Time Are Super Tough Now…But They Were Even Worse Before

Just about all of us are dealing with non-payers or vacancies and it looks like being a small private landlord is a hopeless investment.

It’s not. You can succeed and make a lot of money.

As some who bought his first rental property in 1981 I’ve seen it all.

Our province is the golden land and the problem is the federal government often makes some poor polices which hurt our economy.

And we rely on oil prices and access to sell our product.

Bad Times Can Change To Good Times Fast

Keep confident because it’s always a cycle.

We get low oil prices and a bad government and it hurts us…but then we get a pro-Alberta government and high oil prices and it’s like 2014 when landlords could charge applicants $50 just to see our rentals!

Hold On And Good Times Always Come, You Lose If You Don’t Hold On.

Like I said, our economy is cyclical. We are up and down due to who is running the country and oil prices.

Things could be improving soon and then your rental industry will boom!

Remember it wasn’t so long ago Calgary Mayor Nenshi was blaming us for high rents when there was a huge migration of people to come to work in our province.

Become An Expert Landlord To Hold On During Bad Times, And Thrive During The Good Times.

The up cycle is on the way. Landlords will see our property prices appreciate and a huge influx of people into our province for jobs.

Stay Positive

It’s always like this. We have an up and down economy and things are soon going to get better.

How To Succeed?

(1) Market Your Properties The Right Way

Remember, when good tenants have lots of choices you can stand out with the prettiest property and  consider a lower rent for the first years.

(2) Always Run Credit and Criminal Checks

The ALA offers huge discounts so you can make sure you know you are renting from a good tenant…and not a pro who has ripped people off before.

(3) Get Help From Successful Alberta Landlords To Fix Problems

Join our forum to get help and advice. Don’t listen to the media, don’t listen to the government…learn from people like me who have been in this industry for decades.

I’ve been through it all, all the ups and downs. The most successful landlords know we have a cyclical economy and when times are tough you just ‘get through it’ and carefully screen tenants.

When times are good you raise rents to build a nest egg (and you might even sell some of your rentals at the top of the market!)

Discuss this at the Alberta Landlords Forum

PAY YOUR RENT CAMPAIGN 2020

Smart Tenants Will Pay Rent & Cooperate With Your Landlord For a Win-Win Situation

Small landlords know the challenges tenants face.  Because we faced them too!  Many us were renters before.

We want to work with you to keep you renting from us.

Please know that just because we own a rental property, or rent out our basement, doesn’t mean we are rich. We aren’t.

Many of us are working class people who have decided to avoid the crazy stock market and buy a rental property to help us when we retire.

We need rent to be paid so we can also survive and want to cooperate with you to make sure we have a win-win relationship. We have to pay our mortgage, property taxes, insurance, maintenance.

There are calls saying “Don’t Pay Rent” all over social media

We want to make sure tenants know good landlords want to work with you for all of us surviving.

We support tenants in need, but many of us are also on the financial edge!

To prove our support, thousands of landlords and this association are lobbying both the provincial and federal government to create a nation-wide “rent bank” that will help tenants in need get grants or low-cost loans to pay rent.

This will make sure there is no “landlord-tenant” conflicts or haggling and keep landlords in business and tenants safe in their rental homes.

Something similar to the Canada student loan system where people in temporary need get financial help from the government.

Landlords want to work with tenants (and tenant groups) to make this happen. And happen fast!

Avoid The “Don’t Pay Your Rent” Memes and Media

This isn’t a poor tenant vs. a rich evil landlord issue.

It’s a working class tenant facing challenges renting from a working class small landlord who is also facing challenges.

If you don’t pay rent (like so many are saying) it will lead to eventually being evicted with large debts, and your search for a new home will include no reference and bad credit.

Good Landlords and Good Tenants Working Together

Tenants make sure you pay your rent on time, or work it out with your landlord.

Short term easy answers like “don’t pay rent” will lead to unnecessary problems for tenants a few months from now.

These groups should be joining us to lobby for a nation-wide rent bank to truly help tenants instead of wanting to “stick it to the landlord” (which only lead to legal issues down the road). But it’s so sexy to be a revolutionary, right?

Be Smart

If you can’t pay rent work things out with your landlord who will give you a discount or deferred payments.

Paying Rent or Cooperating With Your Landlord On A Fair Payment Plan Is the Smart Move!

Share Your Landlord Experiences To Make Your Voice Heard

Create your own user feedback survey

Need Help In These Challenging Times?

Tenants Not Paying Rent?

Landlord and Tenant Branch is Closed?

Government Says Evictions Are Illegal?

What’s Going On And How Can Landlords Survive  (and even thrive?)

The rental industry is pretty crazy these days. According to the government we can’t even evict tenants who refuse to pay to pay rent.

And lawyers and paralegals are demanding huge fees to “help” you with no guarantees of refunds if they lose at the tenancy branch.

Go ahead and ask them: if you don’t give me the result for the thousands of dollars I pay, will you pay me back?

Now is the time for all small business landlords to join our community and we become a strong voice for change!

Network with other landlords, many successful and experienced, to make sure your rental business succeeds

Join Our Landlord Community for A One Time Registration Fee!

Alberta Landlords Need To Be Able To Evict Non-Paying Tenants

Landlords Across Alberta Need The Legal System Up & Running

Small landlords are different than big REIT corporate landlords. Many of us used to rent ourselves, or we have friends and family members who rent.

We are understanding and helpful. We are patient and kind to our tenants. We want to work things out for a win-win situation. We aren’t afraid of posts on this site to help tenants.

We also need rent to be paid on time in order to survive!

Small landlords don’t have economies of scale, don’t have huge cash reserves, and many need rent paid each month just to cover our costs.

A large number of tenants are co-operating with their landlords and deferring rent or creating payment plans.

However, many tenants are not paying rent or even a portion of rent.

Many tenants even with the means to pay are simply saying “No.”

They know they cannot be evicted and are ‘gaming’ the system by not paying when they can.

In our internal polling over 60% of tenants did not pay rent on May 1st.

WE NEED RENT TO BE PAID OR NON-PAYING TENANTS TO BE EVICTED!

We understand many tenants are facing financial difficulties. But do not put their financial problems on the backs of small residential landlords who are also suffering.

If you think this is cruel then government can just give the tenants a grant or a loan, instead of putting all the pressure on small landlords.

We need to open up the legal process and allow small landlords to evict non-paying renters.

Over 50% of our internal polling shows small landlords are going to sell if they cannot collect rent or evict non-paying tenants within the next couple of months.

This will hurt the entire rental stock of our province. Where is the long term planning by our government leaders…leaders who our members help get elected on their promise of “making Alberta open for business!” LOL!

The Alberta Landlords Association Will Get Your Voice Heard

We are sending your ideas and concerns directly to the Premier.

Please send us your support of “Landlords Must Be Able To Evict Non-Paying Tenants” to us at  evictnow@lobbyist.com

We Need To Be United and Together To Send A Strong Message!

We Need the Legal Process Working And To Be Able To Evict Non-Paying Tenants!

Did Your Tenants Pay May 1st Rent?

Create your own user feedback survey

I Paid My Landlord And It Was The Right Thing To Do

When our premier announced that tenants do not have to pay rent during this horrible crisis tenants face I immediately felt better.

It was nice to know Premier Ford understood what I was dreading and said there will be “NO EVICTIONS” until the crisis is over. With businesses closed and workers being laid off, how could we pay the rent for the next six months or more?

I saw on FB and on signs in my area that many Tenants in financial trouble were saying we didn’t have to pay rent at all.  The reason is because we can’t be evicted we didn’t have to pay rent.

So If You Don’t Pay Rent Nothing Happens?

This sounded almost too good to be true. I didn’t have to pay any rent for the next few months or more…maybe up to year.

The premier also said tenants should only “pay what you can” and not make paying rent a priority.

So he basically was saying, make up your budget and put rent last.

I Have A Great Relationship With My Landlord

Since moving in a couple years ago I’m very happy here in my Home. The landlords are nice people who gave me a very low rent to begin with because I’m a working woman who is rarely at home with great credit so they thought I was their tenant.

Ideal Tenant (Working woman, not home much, great credit) Gets Discount

They gave me 20% of market rent right off the bat because they praised me as being the type of person landlords want to rent to. This made me very happy to hear and they gave me the discount on what they were advertising because I said I was going to be renting for at least a few years while I built up my savings.

I Could Pay No Rent, But I Worked Out A Rebate Plan 

Since I have such a good relationship with my landlords (they love me, I’m never home and never late paying) I learned a lot.

Most landlords are not independently wealthy and cannot afford to pay the mortgage out of their own pocket. They need rent every month just to survive.

I Paid Rent…But Only % That Was Fair To Both Sides

I made my own budget and made sure my most important expenses were on top of the list and the rent was at the bottom (but still there, as it’s only fair to my landlord).

I calculated my decreased salary due to less hours minus my main expenses for survival during this crisis. Most important expenses:

-Stocking up on food and moisturizers just in case

-Buying food for fresh daily eating

-Costs of ordering Take-Out and the extra costs for UberEats, etc.

-Costs of feeding my cat and ordering her food.

-Ordering clothes I will need if I’m stuck in my Home for a long time. Fresh panties are always refreshing. A girl in a cage needs fashion too!

-Saving for masks and potential medicines.

-Entertainment such as renewing my Netflix, CBS, and Amazon Prime accounts.

I Paid Rent…And Helped My Landlord Stay In Business

After all my budget expenses I ended up paying my landlord 40% of the usual amount.

My landlord was happy to get the rent without any issues and with no haggling.

They appreciated me even paying and I’m happy I did the right thing to help them would I could have paid $1 if I was the evil, nasty type of bitch.

Work With Your Landlord Like I Did

I could have just said I didn’t have the money but I know my landord who are a nice couple so I decided to work with them like the Premier said.

40% Paid, 60% Discount Due To My Struggles

I paid 40% of the rent for April and will pay that same amount as long as the pandemic continues.

If you have a good small landlord consider paying them at least a little bit because they are in need of rent for their families.

Let’s work together and at least pay your landlord a little bit to keep them also surviving…but don’t pay them the full amount because you need to spend your money on your needs first!

Alberta Landlords Association Launches Fire Safety Campaign for 2019-2020!

Alberta landlords fire safety campaign

Successful Alberta Landlords Always Make Sure Their Rental Property Is “Fire Safe” At All Times in 2019-2020!

Alberta landlords know the importance of maintaining our rental properties. We know that to be successful you want attractive and properties that your tenants will find comfortable and want to live in.

Experienced Alberta landlords know if the place feels like ‘home’ it will attract all the good tenants out there and lead them to want to rent from you. Who doesn’t want a nice home to live in? Bright rentals with big windows, clean, nicely decorated, with great working appliances…it’s the key to success for Alberta residential landlords.

Experienced and successful landlords also know it’s important to make sure your Alberta rental property is safe and up to legal code.

To promote all residential landlords in the province to make sure their rental property is safe the Alberta Landlords Association has launched our “Alberta Landlords Fire Safety Campaign” for 2018!

We want every landlord in in Alberta to make fire safety a priority.

To help make this happen and to save lives we contacted Tina Parker. Tina is a technical adviser at Alberta Fire Services and was very helpful.

We truly thank Tina for taking the time to answer our questions. Please see our questions and her answers below:

1. What are the responsibilities of residential landlords when it comes to fire safety?

Depending on the jurisdiction in which these properties reside in, there may be different requirements or different permitting requirements. It is best to check with the local Authority Having Jurisdiction (AHJ) to determine what they require the landlords to complete. The AHJ is usually the local fire department or it could be the Office of the Fire Commissioner.

Here are a few examples from various areas within our province:

– http://www.calgary.ca/CSPS/Fire/Documents/2010-2503-CFD-building-owners-brochure.pdf

– http://www.calgary.ca/CSPS/Fire/Pages/Inspections-investigations-and-permitting/Inspections-investigations-and-permitting.aspx

– http://www.rmwb.ca/Municipal-Government/municipal_departments/Emergency-Services—Law-Enforcement/RES/Fire-Prevention/Fire-Safety-for-Businesses-and-Contractors.htm

– http://www.cityofgp.com/index.aspx?page=408

2. What are the rules for rental properties regarding making their property fire safe? Are there general guidelines or specific rules? Where can these be found for landlords to learn to make their rentals safe for tenants?

Often times landlords are governed more by their insurance provider to comply with codes and standards, not limited to the Alberta Fire Code.

There are Alberta Building Code and Electrical Code standards they may also need to comply with. Depending on where the rental units are in the province of Alberta, it might be best if the owners contact the local AHJ to ensure they have all the applicable permits and request an inspection of the property to ensure they meet the required code(s). Those local AHJ’s may also have a check list that would their municipalities require business owners/property owners to utilize.

Also, this website may be of assistance to you and your organization:

– http://www.programs.alberta.ca/living/Dynamic.aspx?N=770+599+609

This site provides inspection reports that may be of interest and it also has a handbook that provides you with information from Service Alberta. This handbook reviews the Residential Tenancies Act and goes over rights and responsibilities. ( http://www.servicealberta.ca/621.cfm)

3. What are the rules for landlords when it comes to smoke detectors?

2.16.2.15. Smoke Alarms

1) Smoke alarms conforming to CAN/ULC-S531, “Smoke-Alarms,” shall be installed in accordance with Subsection 9.10.19. of Division B of the ABC in each dwelling unit.

2) Smoke alarms shall be installed by permanent connections to an electrical circuit and, when acceptable to the authority having jurisdiction, the interconnection of smoke alarms can either be hard wired or wireless so that activation of one smoke alarm will cause all alarms within both dwelling units to sound. (See Appendix A.)

3) Smoke alarms shall be installed in areas that are common to both dwelling units and connected in conformance with Sentence (2).

Please note these wordings are taken from the most current code. Depending on when the property was built/permits issued, they may need older code wordings.

4. What are the rules for landlords when it comes to carbon monoxide detectors?

2.16.2.16. Carbon Monoxide Alarms

1) Carbon monoxide alarms conforming to CSA 6.19, “Residential Carbon
Monoxide Alarming Devices,” shall be installed in accordance with Sentence
9.32.3.9.(2) of Division B of the ABC in the primary and secondary dwelling units.

2) Carbon monoxide alarms shall be installed by permanent connections to an
electrical circuit and interconnected so that the activation of one carbon monoxide alarm will cause all alarms within both dwelling units to sound. (See Appendix A.)

3) Carbon monoxide alarms shall be installed in areas that are common to both
dwelling units and connected in conformance with Sentence (2).

2.16.2.17. Inspection, Testing and Maintenance of Smoke Alarms and Carbon
Monoxide Alarms

1) Smoke alarms and carbon monoxide alarms required by this Section shall be
inspected, tested and maintained in conformance with the manufacturer’s instructions.

Appendix A

A-2.16.2.16.(2) The interconnection of carbon monoxide alarms may be hard wired or wireless. Secondary suites that have been upgraded in accordance with the AFC 2014 are permitted to install plug-in or battery-powered carbon monoxide alarms if such installation is deemed appropriate by the authority having jurisdiction.

5. Regarding enforcement of the laws, what type of fines can landlords face if they are not following the laws?

Please visit Service Alberta web page and the Safety Codes Council web page.

– http://www.safetycodes.ab.ca/Public/Pages/CodesPermits.aspx

– http://www.servicealberta.ca/621.cfm

Also, the Safety Codes Act lays out Penalties for Offences (Prohibitions – Offences 67(1)).

– http://www.qp.alberta.ca/documents/Acts/S01.pdf

6. What can tenants do if they worry their rental home isn’t fire safe?

They can contact the local AHJ and the Landlord and Tenants Council for their areas. Please see Service Alberta website.

7. What happens if a tenant disables a smoke detector? Can they be fined?

It depends on the circumstances around this. Fines may or may not be done; depends on the AHJ and the circumstances around the event(s).

8. Are there any great resources you recommend for residential landlords to learn more about their responsibilities when it comes to fire safety?

Having a good working relationship with the local AHJ and reviewing the web pages that have been provided to you. Also contacting their local Landlord and Tenants Council for clarity.

9. Are there any sites where tenants can learn about their rights and responsibilities when it comes to fire safety.

See above responses.

10. How can small private residential landlords go the extra mile to make their rental property ultra safe for their tenants.

Engaging with the local AHJ’s and also with the tenants on what is required and what is expected.

There are a lot of resources available for both tenants and landlords and we encourage both parties to review and engage in those resources.

Alberta landlords make fire safety a priority in 2018! If you have questions contact your local Fire Department and the provincial Fire Services Department who will be happy to assist you improve your rental property!

Landlord Communities

Our Sponsors

Tenant Screening, Tenant Credit Check, Tenant Background Check, Landlord Screening
Tenant Screening, Tenant Credit Check, Tenant Background Check, Landlord Screening

National Landlord Help