Alberta Landlords Association


Welcome to the ALA for Small Business Landlords

The Alberta Landlords Association (ALA) and its sister organization The Canada Landlords Association (CLA) are leading provincial and national organizations for private small residential landlords. We provide a unified voice for private landlords and promote and protect landlord interests to national and local government.

  • Network with top professionals
  • Get advice from experienced landlords
  • Learn how the Landlord and Tenant Board works
  • Meet our recommended partners
  • Take part in landlord activities, social events.
  • A chance to "get involved!"

The Alberta Landlord Knowledge Vault

Alberta landlord knowledge vault

Get Real World “In the Trenches” Advice From Experienced and Successful Alberta Landlords & Property Managers

Experienced and successful Alberta landlords know there are a lot of great renters out there. For years Alberta has been a place hard-working people from across Canada want to come to.

Even with the recent economic downturn people see Alberta as the ideal place to find a job, start a business, put down roots, start a family, and invest in the future.

What Makes A Great Renter?

Long time landlords know the key to being a successful Alberta landlord is finding good renters. These are people who pay their rent on time, take care of the rental property, and respect their landlord and other renters (if it’s a multi-unit rental).

An Edmonton landlord wrote about her great tenants saying:

“They are a couple who moved here from Nova Scotia and found work. They keep the property clean, pay the rent with post-dated cheques and are just wonderful people.” 

A Calgary landlord who rents his basement wrote:

“There are still good renters out there if you have an attractive place at the right price. I rent to a younger guy who is working two jobs now and also studying at night! He says his goal is to land a good job and be a landlord himself one day!”

Be Careful Because Bad Renters Are Out There Too!

A recent story on the CBC news site is about a landlord named Jennifer Leeming who owns a rental property in Calgary. 

Jennifer did all the right things. She had a bright and spacious rental property on the market and had the best intentions to be a super landlord and rent out her beautiful rental property. It sounds so simple, right? A caring landlord with a wonderful rental property just waiting for good renters. It should be so simple…but it isn’t!

Dedicated, caring single mom landlord tried to help her renters out, and in return they destroyed her rental property

Tenants From Hell

Jennifer ended up with “Tenants from Hell” who played the system and ended up costing her huge financial losses.When the renters asked for a break this landlord tried to accommodate them and work something out. This was a big mistake as it only led to more damages to the rental unit, more non-paid rent, and bigger problems.

The new flooring was treated like an ashtray.  The renters didn’t even have the common courtesy to buy an ashtray at the dollar or go outside to smoke.

Alberta landlords rental vault 3

There were many holes in the drywall all over the property. And the stair railings were ripped out making it dangerous to go up and down the stairs.

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The nicely renovated bathrooms were destroyed.

These “Tenant From Hell” caused tens of thousands of dollars in damages!

Just Follow the System, Right?

Wrong.  Look what happened.

When Jennifer started the eviction process the renters challenged her and said: “I’M NOT MOVING UNTIL YOU PROVIDE A COURT DOCUMENT! “ Unfortunately this type of rude and aggressive behaviour is common with bad tenants who are going to rip you off.

Tenants Finally Left…Then Vanished Without Paying a Cent

And when Jennifer used the RTDRS and got them out what happened? She got paid by the tenants for the amount the RTDRS ordered right? Unfortunately, it didn’t work out that way.

After she served the tenants, they did a midnight run and took off to Saskatchewan. They did all the damages and it will be basically impossible to ever to recover her losses from these “Tenants From Hell”.

Dealing With Alberta Tenant Challenges

When you rent to tenants you need to be aware of the system and the rules. The old saying “Knowledge is Power” really applies to being a landlord in Alberta these days.

And as Jennifer found out, just going through the system often isn’t enough and leads to huge headaches, drawn out evictions, and even bigger financial losses. 

According to landlord Jennifer:

“I feel it’s so unfair. I’ve worked my entire life to provide for my family and my child’s future and people have come along and taken that all away and that’s just so wrong”

Alberta Landlord Knowledge Vault

In order to help Alberta landlords succeed we asked experienced and successful landlords and property managers to come up with tips and strategies to help small residential landlords succeed.

Don’t Be a Victim of Bad Tenants

It’s more important than every before to learn tips and strategies to make sure your rental business is successful. The harsh reality is there are lots of bad renters out there and they can cost you thousands of dollars and months of headaches and heartaches.

Successful Alberta Landlords

There are a lot of great tenants out there. And there are also a lot of potential “Tenants From Hell”. With the Alberta Landlord Vault you can get the tips and strategies you need to succeed.

The Alberta Landlord Knowledge Vault

Alberta landlord knowledge vault

We asked some of the most experienced landlords and property managers to put together a vault of answers to help other landlords succeed.

And they came through big time – and we put their knowledge together in a professionally recorded audio CD that helps you through all the steps to running a successful and profitable rental business, in good economic times or bad.

Here are some of the issues answered in the Alberta Landlord Knowledge Vault to help you succeed as a landlord in Alberta.

What you get is a “start” to “finish” guide to becoming a successful Alberta landlord and how to deal with situations fast and effectively before they become like cancer and grow. No marketing hype, only real work “in the trenches” advice to help small landlords succeed.

Questions and discussion includes the following:

What really are the best ways to prepare my rental to attract the best renters out there looking for a place?

How can I convince the best tenants to rent from me over other landlords? How do successful landlords do this?

Do I need to get any type of special insurance for my rental to protect myself and my financial future?

What are good potential renters really looking for these days and how can I make my rental property special?

Is it a good idea to pay for a property manager or manage things myself?

I hear stories about some bad property managers out there! How do you choose the best property manager?

Is it a good idea to hire a real estate agent to rent out my property?

How do you set the best rental prices for your rental to advertise at attract premium tenants?

How do you do expert market research on your local rental market?

How do you ultimately decide how much the rent will be?

How do you pre-screen tenants to not waste time with bringing people you won’t don’t want to see the apartment?

How do experienced landlords really successfully screen tenants who want to rent from you?

How do you set times to show your rental property?

Tenants keep cancelling appointments on me and it’s driving me nuts. How do you fix this?

Do you screen everyone who is going to move in or is that not the way to do it?

Why is asking what renters are currently paying for rent important for me?

How do you avoid applicants who are just playing games and not serious?

How can I make sure the applicants say who they say they are and not playing games?

My applicants want me to explain to them! Do you tell your potential renters how you are screening them?

What’s the best way to verify if they are working or not? I want to avoid renting to scammers!

How do you go into really “in-depth” checking of their employment information and avoiding lying tenants?

How do you screen self-employed applicants to make sure they are financially sound?

How do experienced landlords screen applicants moving to Alberta from other provinces?

How important are personal references for Alberta landlords? How do you know if a reference is fishy or valid?

What do you do if the applicants refuses to give their current landlords information?

What do you do if an applicants refuses to provide their SIN number?

How do you run a credit check on a potential renter to find out the most important information?

How do you read a credit check to determine if you should rent to them or not?

What do you do if their credit history shows late payments?

What do you do if the credit check shows a lot of debt?

What do you do if there is a collection on the renter’s credit report?

What types of credit scores do experienced Alberta landlords demand?

How do you really choose the best tenants to put into your rental?

If you have two really good applicants, what is the real criteria to choose one over the other?

What do you do if the applicants have no credit history but seem like good people?

How do you avoid renting from professional tenants who will cause me to lose thousands of dollars?

How the heck do you notify the person you want to rent to?

Are there any tips or strategies when telling your applicant you will rent to them?

How do you make sure the renters are clear on the rules from day 1 to avoid future problems?

What types of leases do you use?

What’s a period tenancy?

What’s a fixed term lease?

What’s better, a periodic tenancy or a fixed term lease…and why?

What information should I include in my lease to protect myself. I’m looking for the most protection!

Does the lease have to be in writing?

Can I require proof of insurance as a condition of the lease?

Is it okay to say no pets are allowed in the lease?

Can Alberta landlords change a pet fee or not?

What happens at the end of fixed term lease?

Can I charge a security deposit? How does that work in Alberta?

Can I charge a non-refundable pet fee and also charge a security deposit?

Can I deduct money from the security deposit for carpet cleaning, painting, and other damages?

If two tenants are renting my place and one moves out do I have to return half the security deposit?

Do you do an inspection when renters move out?

What happens if the tenant doesn’t show up for the move out inspection?

What do you do if your tenants don’t pay rent?

Can I best do an eviction if the renters don’t pay rent?  I need to get this done fast!

What do you do if the tenant breaks a rule in the lease?

What types of notices are available if your renters are breaking the rules of your lease?

What are the reasons I can use to evict a renter?

If the renters are damaging my rental what can I do?

If tenants are threatening me or other tenants in the building what can I do?

My renters are playing their music super loud so what can I do?

My renters are dealing drugs what can I do? This is a very troubling situation!

The Tenants are leaving garbage all over the place so what do expert landlords do when this happens?

If the tenants refuse to leave at the end of the lease what do you do?

Can my tenants have lots of guests over at all times?

My renters want my contact information. Should I give it to them?

I don’t want to give my personal information for safety reasons but do I have to provide it to tenants?

One group of tenants is complaining other tenants are noisy so what should I do? It becoming a nightmare!

I’m selling my property so do I have to tell my renters?

The new buyer of my rental wants to keep the tenants so how do I handle this?

I live with my tenant and she is nuts and argues with me about everything so what can I do?

How do you fix problems with tenants who live in your house with you?

Can I go to the Residential Tenancy Dispute Resolution Service for problems with renters living in my house?

How to you handle renters who want to sublet?

Can I refuse a tenant who wants to sublet my rental property?

How do you reply to a renter who wants to sublet?

My tenant says he wants to assign his apartment so what can I do?

What are legal grounds to refuse a sublet or assignment as I don’t feel comfortable with it?

My tenants did some repairs and now are charging me! Do I have to pay?

The new people I rented to brought in bedbugs so what can I do?

How do you give notice if you are going into the rental to do repairs?

How do you give notice to your tenants to enter the rental property?

Can a contractor enter the rental property without the landlord being present?

My tenant said she doesn’t have to pay rent while I’m doing repairs. Is this true?

How do landlords deal with tenants who are smoking or growing marijuana?

My tenants are fighting over their shared laundry do I have to get involved?

My renters go laid off and want to break the lease so what should I do? 

How do you deal with tenant vs. tenant issues?

Do I have to give my tenants who are moving a recommendation?

My renters got laid off and want to break the lease so what can I do?

My tenants want to change the lease agreement and say I have to, is this true?

The current rent check is NSF what should I do and they didn’t move out! What can I do?

My tenants are rude and aggressive to me. I’m scared and wonder how I should deal with them?

I think I have “Tenants From Hell” and need help!  Renter trashing the unit, cops won’t help, drunk. What should I do?

Alberta Landlord Knowledge Vault – Get Help From Experienced and Successful Alberta Landlords and Property Managers

The Alberta landlord vault is designed to help landlords succeed.  Make sure you run your rental business the right way by knowing your rights and responsibilities and being ready to handle any challenges that might arise in a fast and effective manner.

Knowledge is power and by knowing how the industry works you can take control of your rental business! Get access the The Alberta Landlord Knowledge Vault in the Intermediate Services for a one time fee.

 

Alberta Landlords and Tenants Working Together For Success

Alberta landlords Alberta Tenants Win Win Campaign

Alberta Landlords are Looking for Good Tenants. Alberta Tenants are Looking for Good Landlords and Nice Properties. Let’s Work Together and Communicate To Make a “Win Win” Situation for Everyone!

We keep reading about complicated and dramatic landlord and tenant issues in Alberta. But being a landlord or a tenant really should be simple shouldn’t it?

Let’s look at it this way. Someone invests in a product. They want to attract good clients so they make sure the product is high quality. On the other hand, there are clients out there looking for a high quality product. When they meet if they both have what the other wants, the transaction is made and both sides are happy.

This is the way it should be for Alberta rental properties. Landlords invest in a nice rental property and advertise it. Tenants are looking for a good rental, see it, and both sides meet. If both sides see what they want the landlord offers the rental unit to the tenant and they sign the lease. It sounds so simple right?

Unfortunately while it sounds simple, in reality it’s not always like that. The Alberta Residential Tenancy Dispute Resolution Service is busy and that is because there are landlords and tenants who are in conflict, fighting each other. We also see lots of bad stories in the news about problems between landlords and tenants.

In some cases it’s good tenants who are having problems with their landlord. We have had politicians accusing landlords of gouging good tenants when the vacancy rates were low and the economy was strong.

In many other cases it’s a good landlord getting ripped off and hurt by bad tenants. For example, this Calgary landlord is out tens of thousands of dollars because the system failed her when manipulated by tenants who were unethical and out to do no good.

Alberta Has A Lot of Good Landlords

Alberta has a lot of hard working people who want to invest in rental properties here. These are people who likely rented themselves at one point and want to invest in nice properties that they themselves would have wanted to live in. Landlords are people who are investing their hard earned money back into the province because they believe in a bright future here. Alberta landlords are important stake holders and play an important role in the success of our province.

Landlords and Tenants Need To Communicate With Each Other

Many of our landlords members think the best way landlords and tenants can create a “win win” situation is for us to communicate with each other.  Not at “hearings” or in the “media”, but with some frank and friendly talk between landlords and tenants.  Let’s get to know each other better and learn what both sides are looking for these days.

We know you are our future “customers” and we want to make sure we are the “best landlords” we can be and we have the “best rental rental properties we can have”. We want to be the best Alberta landlords you have ever had! Let’s work together to make this happen!

What Do Good Alberta Tenants Want? Let Us Know

Good Alberta landlords are always looking for good paying tenants. So we want to hear from all the tenants out there. We are asking you to “help us, so we can help you.”

1. What types of things are most important for you when choosing a rental?

2. Is there anything about a rental that would be a big turn off?

3. Is there anything particular that would lead you to choose a rental over another?

4. What are the ways you find potential places to rent?

5. How important is it for the rental ad to have pictures?

6. Is there anything particular that makes a rental ad stand out to you?

7. What are you looking for in a person who will be your potential landlord?

8. Is important for you to rent from an experienced landlord?

9. What types of questions do you have for landlords to show they are professional?

10. Is there anything you would do to improve the Alberta rental industry?

Tenants can write in to us at tenantexperiences@groupmail.com and let us know your answers to these questions or about anything else to improve the Alberta rental industry. We won’t edit or censor anything and are looking for your side of things.

Alberta Landlords and Tenants Working Together For Success

Both landlords and tenants play an important role in the success of our province. Let’s work together to make things better and improve the Alberta rental industry for years to come.

Alberta Landlords Association Launches Fire Safety Campaign for 2017!

Successful Alberta Landlords Always Make Sure Their Rental Property Is “Fire Safe” At All Times!

Alberta landlords know the importance of maintaining our rental properties. We know that to be successful you want attractive and properties that your tenants will find comfortable and want to live in.

Experienced Alberta landlords know if the place feels like ‘home’ it will attract all the good tenants out there and lead them to want to rent from you. Who doesn’t want a nice home to live in? Bright rentals with big windows, clean, nicely decorated, with great working appliances…it’s the key to success for Alberta residential landlords.

Experienced and successful landlords also know it’s important to make sure your Alberta rental property is safe and up to legal code.

To promote all residential landlords in the province to make sure their rental property is safe the Alberta Landlords Association has launched our “Alberta Landlords Fire Safety Campaign” for 2016!

We want every landlord in in Alberta to make fire safety a priority.

To help make this happen and to save lives we contacted Tina Parker. Tina is a technical adviser at Alberta Fire Services and was very helpful.

We truly thank Tina for taking the time to answer our questions. Please see our questions and her answers below:

1. What are the responsibilities of residential landlords when it comes to fire safety?

Depending on the jurisdiction in which these properties reside in, there may be different requirements or different permitting requirements. It is best to check with the local Authority Having Jurisdiction (AHJ) to determine what they require the landlords to complete. The AHJ is usually the local fire department or it could be the Office of the Fire Commissioner.

Here are a few examples from various areas within our province:

– http://www.calgary.ca/CSPS/Fire/Documents/2010-2503-CFD-building-owners-brochure.pdf

– http://www.calgary.ca/CSPS/Fire/Pages/Inspections-investigations-and-permitting/Inspections-investigations-and-permitting.aspx

– http://www.rmwb.ca/Municipal-Government/municipal_departments/Emergency-Services—Law-Enforcement/RES/Fire-Prevention/Fire-Safety-for-Businesses-and-Contractors.htm

– http://www.cityofgp.com/index.aspx?page=408

2. What are the rules for rental properties regarding making their property fire safe? Are there general guidelines or specific rules? Where can these be found for landlords to learn to make their rentals safe for tenants?

Often times landlords are governed more by their insurance provider to comply with codes and standards, not limited to the Alberta Fire Code.

There are Alberta Building Code and Electrical Code standards they may also need to comply with. Depending on where the rental units are in the province of Alberta, it might be best if the owners contact the local AHJ to ensure they have all the applicable permits and request an inspection of the property to ensure they meet the required code(s). Those local AHJ’s may also have a check list that would their municipalities require business owners/property owners to utilize.

Also, this website may be of assistance to you and your organization:

– http://www.programs.alberta.ca/living/Dynamic.aspx?N=770+599+609

This site provides inspection reports that may be of interest and it also has a handbook that provides you with information from Service Alberta. This handbook reviews the Residential Tenancies Act and goes over rights and responsibilities. ( http://www.servicealberta.ca/621.cfm)

3. What are the rules for landlords when it comes to smoke detectors?

2.16.2.15. Smoke Alarms

1) Smoke alarms conforming to CAN/ULC-S531, “Smoke-Alarms,” shall be installed in accordance with Subsection 9.10.19. of Division B of the ABC in each dwelling unit.

2) Smoke alarms shall be installed by permanent connections to an electrical circuit and, when acceptable to the authority having jurisdiction, the interconnection of smoke alarms can either be hard wired or wireless so that activation of one smoke alarm will cause all alarms within both dwelling units to sound. (See Appendix A.)

3) Smoke alarms shall be installed in areas that are common to both dwelling units and connected in conformance with Sentence (2).

Please note these wordings are taken from the most current code. Depending on when the property was built/permits issued, they may need older code wordings.

4. What are the rules for landlords when it comes to carbon monoxide detectors?

2.16.2.16. Carbon Monoxide Alarms

1) Carbon monoxide alarms conforming to CSA 6.19, “Residential Carbon
Monoxide Alarming Devices,” shall be installed in accordance with Sentence
9.32.3.9.(2) of Division B of the ABC in the primary and secondary dwelling units.

2) Carbon monoxide alarms shall be installed by permanent connections to an
electrical circuit and interconnected so that the activation of one carbon monoxide alarm will cause all alarms within both dwelling units to sound. (See Appendix A.)

3) Carbon monoxide alarms shall be installed in areas that are common to both
dwelling units and connected in conformance with Sentence (2).

2.16.2.17. Inspection, Testing and Maintenance of Smoke Alarms and Carbon
Monoxide Alarms

1) Smoke alarms and carbon monoxide alarms required by this Section shall be
inspected, tested and maintained in conformance with the manufacturer’s instructions.

Appendix A

A-2.16.2.16.(2) The interconnection of carbon monoxide alarms may be hard wired or wireless. Secondary suites that have been upgraded in accordance with the AFC 2014 are permitted to install plug-in or battery-powered carbon monoxide alarms if such installation is deemed appropriate by the authority having jurisdiction.

5. Regarding enforcement of the laws, what type of fines can landlords face if they are not following the laws?

Please visit Service Alberta web page and the Safety Codes Council web page.

– http://www.safetycodes.ab.ca/Public/Pages/CodesPermits.aspx

– http://www.servicealberta.ca/621.cfm

Also, the Safety Codes Act lays out Penalties for Offences (Prohibitions – Offences 67(1)).

– http://www.qp.alberta.ca/documents/Acts/S01.pdf

6. What can tenants do if they worry their rental home isn’t fire safe?

They can contact the local AHJ and the Landlord and Tenants Council for their areas. Please see Service Alberta website.

7. What happens if a tenant disables a smoke detector? Can they be fined?

It depends on the circumstances around this. Fines may or may not be done; depends on the AHJ and the circumstances around the event(s).

8. Are there any great resources you recommend for residential landlords to learn more about their responsibilities when it comes to fire safety?

Having a good working relationship with the local AHJ and reviewing the web pages that have been provided to you. Also contacting their local Landlord and Tenants Council for clarity.

9. Are there any sites where tenants can learn about their rights and responsibilities when it comes to fire safety.

See above responses.

10. How can small private residential landlords go the extra mile to make their rental property ultra safe for their tenants.

Engaging with the local AHJ’s and also with the tenants on what is required and what is expected.

There are a lot of resources available for both tenants and landlords and we encourage both parties to review and engage in those resources.

Alberta landlords make fire safety a priority in 2015! If you have questions contact your local Fire Department and the provincial Fire Services Department who will be happy to assist you improve your rental property!

Alberta Landlords Association Launches Our ‘Landlords Making A Difference In Our Communities Campaign 2017’

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With “Rent Control”, “Reduced Security Deposits” and Other Issues Being Discussed It’s Important To Appreciate All the Good Landlords Who Provide High Quality, Affordable Rentals In Our Province

Successful Alberta landlords know the importance of maintaining our rental properties. We know that to be successful you need attractive and affordable properties that your tenants will find comfortable and want to live in. 

Good tenants tend to stay a lot longer when a property is nice, well-maintained and priced right.

Successful Alberta landlords also know it’s important for a landlord to be professional. This means knowing the rules and laws, following the rules and laws, and cooperating with tenants for a “win-win” situation.  We make tenant screening a priority to find good tenants, and make sure tenants know we are good landlords with great rental properties looking for a win-win business relationship.

Our community of hard-working and professional small landlords across the province know that good landlords can make a difference in our communities and we are working hard to improve the rental industry in Alberta.

Small Residential Alberta Landlords Play An Important Role and Are Important Stake-Holders

Alberta landlords have invested in our province and are important stake-holders. Because we believe in the success of Alberta we have invested our hard earned money here. 

We create great rental properties which in turn improves our communities.  We create welcoming homes for others coming to Alberta who also believe in the successful future of our province.

Great People Make Great Landlords

Many members of our community have careers.  They work hard in their jobs and play important roles in our cities and towns.  They volunteer in things such as soccer and hockey programs and play active roles in our charities. They are also great landlords! 

It’s important to remember that a large portion of landlords in our province are not faceless, soulless corporations.  Many of our best rental properties are provided by independent business people.

Small residential landlords also play an important role in our local economy. 

We spend a lot to maintain our properties.  We hire plumbers, painters, electricians and plumbers. We go to our local stores to buy doors, windows, drywall and other things we need to maintain our properties.  We buy curtains, blinds, and expensive appliances to make our renters happy.

It’s important to realize it’s essential to create rules that encourage terrific housing providers invested in the rental industry to continue to do so. Some people are already leaving the industry.

It wasn’t that long ago when we didn’t have enough rental properties in our market. If current landlords decide to leave the industry and we discourage new landlords to invest we are setting ourselves up for problems when things pick up again (and it will pick up).

Challenges For Alberta Landlords

Residential landlords faced a lot of challenges the past year and face challenges in 2017.

First of all, the economy is undergoing a difficult time and it’s had a large impact on everyone. Non-landlords need to realize that landlords are not immune to these economic challenges. 

Small landlords face the problem of vacancies as it’s becoming harder to find qualified tenants.  An Edmonton landlord recently wrote it took her three months to find tenants.  That means three months of no income from her rental property.

Rents are also dropping in some areas.  A Calgary landlord wrote in our Members Forum that she negotiated with potential renters and ended up dropping the rent and including a lot of costly incentives.  She ended up having to max out her credit card just to fill her rental property.

Add in the fact that some of the larger property management companies can afford to offer lots of incentives to renters such a huge rent discounts and even big screen tvs and groceries and you can see the challenges small landlords face.

Even when the economy was booming small landlords had challenges.  Now with current economic and market conditions it’s even tougher.

Small Landlords Are Important And Let’s All Work Together For a Healthy Rental Industry

We believe in Alberta and continue to invest here.  However, it’s important for people to realize the challenges we face and our importance as stake-holders in our communities. Now is not the time for things such as “rent control” (which we discussed a few years ago) and “diminished security deposits.”

Alberta Landlords Are Important Stake-Holders In Our Province. We Provide an Important Service and A Key Role In Our Communities

In these challenging times we all need to work together to make our rental industry and our province stronger than ever.  This means all stake-holders need to cooperate and map out a fair and smart strategy together. This also means making sure everyone understands the pressures small landlords face and how valuable we are.

By all of us coming together, and working together, we can make positive, important changes to help good landlords and good tenants.  We believe the best is yet to come for Alberta landlords and all the great tenants in our province.

Alberta Landlords – You Can Find Good Tenants! Get Premium Credit Checks For Only $10/Check

 Alberta landlords rent to good tenants credit check

Alberta Landlords – You Can Become a Member of the Alberta Landlords Association To Find Great Tenants! Join Up and Get Premium Credit Checks for Only $10 / Check!

JUST A ONE-TIME SET UP FEE TO ACCESS $10 CREDIT CHECKS AND THE  RENTAL KIT!

NO ANNUAL FEES OR HIDDEN COSTS! WE HELP SMALL LANDLORDS!

Experienced Alberta landlords know the secret to being a successful landlord in Alberta is to find great tenants (all the while, not renting to the bad ones out there!)

There is a huge group of good tenants coming to our province and they are looking for good landlords. It’s up to you to make sure you find them and they find you!

So What Do You Mean When You Write Good Tenant?

We believe a good tenant is someone who:

1. Good Tenants Pay Their Rent in a Timely Manner

You are their landlord, not their banker. Tenants need to make sure they pay on time. After all, you have to pay your mortgage on time.

2. Good Tenants Make Paying Rent a Priority

Everyone can have some financial blips. Tenants will make sure they contact you if they have to be a day or two late (and provide you with a good reason they are being late this one time).

3. Good Tenants Show Consideration and Respect Towards Their Landlord

You treat your tenants with consideration and respect and good tenants will do the same thing back to you.

4. Good Tenants Take Care of the Rental Property

You won’t have to worry about finding a huge mess when they move out.

5. Good Tenants Communicate With Their Landlord

Is there some leaking happening? Tenants will make sure you know about it so it can be repaired before it becomes major damage requiring an expensive repair.

Okay, Makes Sense. So What Do You Mean By ‘Bad’ Tenant?”

These are tenants who don’t pay rent and don’t respect the landlord or the rental property.

Unfortunately there are a lot of examples out there. Just take a look at what happened to this honest and hard-working Calgary landlord who got burned by sneaky bad tenants (and ended up costing him over $100,000 in losses and he had to sell his rental!)

Remember, good tenants are out there and you just need to find them.

Can You Help Me To Search for Good Tenants?

Yes! One of the keys to run a credit check on all potential tenants. In fact, you really need to run a credit check to make sure you who you are renting to.

I’m Wondering What Does a Tenant Credit Check Show?

A tenant credit check will provide Alberta landlords with the information you need to know to make sure you are renting to the right person.

What Information Is Included With a Tenant Credit Check?

You will be able to verify a bunch of things your tenants wrote in their application.

For instance, you can check their addresses, employment and financial history.

So What’s The Way To Do A Tenant Credit Check?

It’s now easy and simple for landlords to run credit checks.

For only only a one-time registration fee you can join the Alberta Landlords Association.

Not only do you get great documents and a Private Members forum where you can chat with other landlords, you get access to premium credit checks for only $10 Per Check!

While other associations charge you an annual fee, the Alberta Landlords Association exists only to help landlords and only charges a one-time fee!

Alberta Landlords – Become a Member of the Alberta Landlords Association and Start Running Premium Tenant Credit Checks for Only $10 / Check! It’s the Deal of a Life-time!

Alberta Landlords: How to Rent to Good Tenants (and avoid the pros)

 

Join the Alberta Landlords Association and Get Tenant Credit Checks With GARDA for only $12 / check!

Rent to Good Tenants and Avoid the Professional Tenants!

Get amazing and complete information on your potential tenants for an incredible low cost fee!

Alberta landlords know we are in the best province and are happy we have invested in rental properties here.

After all, we have the lowest vacancy rate and the future looks good.

Of course, with so many renters coming to our province there are scamming tenants and schemer tenants out there as well.

They will play games leaving the landlord with thousands of dollars in clean up costs, repairs and owned rent.

How Can Alberta Landlords Make Sure We Rent To Good Tenants?

We often here ‘there is no magic wand.’

However, the Alberta Landlords Association offers something very close to help landlords succeed.

Whether you are a landlord in Edmonton, or in Calgary or in Lethbridge or anywhere in the province GARDA tenant credit checks are essential for landlord success!

Landlords need to be aware that using a friend or relative to do a tenant credit check for you can lead to their Equifax account being closed and the landlord and friend or relative can be subject to a privacy complaint.

GARDA specializes in screening tenants.

GARDA credit checks provide landlords with the most comprehensive and professional tools to make sure you find great tenants and avoid professional tenants.

And this Tenant Credit only costs $12 per check.

What Is GARDA?

GARDA is recognized as the most trusted and leading Canadian owned and operated provider of background screening solutions.

Our services help deliver integrated solutions through highly specialized teams with experience in addressing complex business needs.

The exceptional level of service we provide is unmatched in our industry and our clients can be assured they are receiving the highest quality of service as well as the most innovative and comprehensive solutions in the industry.

Since 1922, Garda has been providing and continues to provide national and international background screening services to major corporations, financial institutions, governments and governmental agencies.

Knowledge is power

Our internal investigation specialists are masters at finding and interpreting the information needed. They will gather all the pertinent information, verify the data and then develop an expert report.

Garda’s background screening solutions provide you with the vital information required to make informed business decisions on the suitability or risk level of a tenant.

Landlord Question:  What Does A GARDA Tenant Credit Check Show Me?

The results provide detailed reports including credit ratings, loans and collections outstanding.

The tenant credit check also includes a verification of the individual identity and employment history

1.         Does a GARDA tenant credit check confirm the tenant’s identity?

Yes, you get complete information confirming it.

For example, the report would show you:

Identification

Name:

DOE, JOHN

Current Address:

123 ANYWHERE ST,

Calgary, Alberta

Date of Birth, SIN:

1966/09/02, 451-333-572

JDOE

2.         Does a GARDA tenant credit check verify their employment?

Yes, you get it confirmed. No more lies, you get it on paper.

Employment (Subject 1) Employment Information:

Current Employer:

T M PET CENTRE

3.         Does a GARDA tenant credit check show past employment?

Yes, you get to see where your potential tenant worked before.

This is important because you can see if they are stable in their work environments.

Since, Left, Position,

Salary:  $XXXXX

05/2001, , Animal Care Technician,

4.         Does a GARDA check show me if they have any judgments against them?

Yes, their checks show judgments and loans.

Filed

Type

Court Name

Court No

Amt

Status

Date

Vrfd

09/2004

Jdgm

BRAMPTON SML CLM CRT

453VC00093

18731

Defendant:

S

Case No:

CV9977007649SR

Plaintiff:

ROYAL BANK OF CDA

 

5.         Does a GARDA tenant credit check who me the tenant’s credit score?

Yes.  You get to see their credit score determining their credit worthiness and showing whether they pay their bills on time.

 CREDIT SCORE:

We have accessed this applicant’s credit report and based on the contents of the report, the credit bureau has assigned a credit Score of 730.

 

Alberta Landlords You Now Have Access To the Nearest Thing to a Magic Wand To Find Good Tenants

Alberta landlords now have a tool to make sure you rent to good tenants.

Take advantage of this opportunity to conduct professional tenant credit checks with an world wide leader for an incredibly low cost!

Alberta Landlords – Is Rent Control Coming?

Is rent control coming to Alberta? According to an editorial in the Whitecourt Star it should be.

Rent control is when the government caps the amount of rent a landlord can charge. The Star believes it’s the solution to the low vacancy rate in Alberta.

Low Vacancy Rate

The vacancy rate is, in fact, very low and tenants are scrambling to find rental apartments.

According to the Canada Housing and Mortage Corp. (CMHC) not only are vacancy rates in Alberta decline, rents are also rising.

The Whitecourt Star’s Argument for Rent Control in Alberta

The Star sent a reporter to look into the rental market in Whitecourt in 2012.

The reporter found there were a lot of tenants in the city looking for rental housing. The report stated there were not enough affordable rental units available and there was a long list of tenants waiting to find a place to rent “at any price.”

The Star editorial stated the Alberta economy was booming and more workers were coming to the province. Despite these jobs there are thousands of homeless living on the street because Calgary and Edmonton landlords won’t rent to them.

While investors and landlords have the right to profit from their rental businesses the Star argues people have the right to a place to live.

According to the Whitecourt Star ‘rent control’ is a way the government “can make this happen.

Rent Control Doesn’t Mean More Affordable Rental Units

The Whitecourt Star argument is wrong. Rent control doesn’t equal more affordable housing.

Other Canadian provinces have rent control

For example, British Columbia landlords can only increase the rent by 2.2% in 2014. Yet tenants there are still complaining rents are too high and something needs to be done.

And even better example is Ontario.

In 2014 Ontario Landlords can only raise the rent a measly 0.8% for their current tenants.

While the Ontario Rent Increase Guideline is tied to the CPI Index rent increases are ‘capped’ at a maximum of 2.5% no matter how high inflation gets.

With rent control and rent increases capped there should be a ton of rental available and rents should be low. 

Except there isn’t.

With so much government control many investors simply avoid investing in residential rental property in Ontario.

The vacancy rates in Ontario are nearly as low as in Alberta.

And there is a huge waiting list for affordable housing in Ontario.

Rent Control Is Not the Answer

Alberta landlords already know rent control is not the way forward for Alberta.

Anyone can see from what is happening in British Columbia and Ontario that rent control only hurts tenants.

Furthermore, landlords in Alberta are already facing increasing challenges.

We hope the Whitecourt Star editorial board thinks more carefully next time.

Tenant Screening Alberta: Tenant Credit Checks & Tenant Criminal Checks

November 1st, 2013

Garda LOGO Medium

There are a lot of terrific tenants out there.

These tenants respect your property.

They respect you, the landlord, and appreciate the excellent property you are providing.

Rent is paid on time and any maintenance or other potential challenges are dealt with in a mature and a professional manner.

Being a residential landlord in Alberta can be a smart and profitable business decision.

Landlord Challenges

There can also be challenges. One look at the local newspaper can tell you that. Or watch the evening news.

Unfortunately we have seen more challenges for Alberta landlords in 2013.

What Type of Challenges?

1. This Rental Home is My Embassy

Last month we wrote about a landlady who rented to a tenant who declared the rental property ‘an embassy’ and refused to pay rent.

It took two years for the landlady to finally get her rental property back.

She rented to him on the recommendation of a friend.

She didn’t conduct a tenant credit check or a tenant criminal check.

2. Tenants Leave Racial Slurs and Property Damages

A Calgary landlord was going through the process to evict a couple of tenants for not paying rent.

When they finally were gone they left behind walls painted with racial insults against the landlord and thousands of dollars in damages.

The landlord didn’t didn’t conduct a tenant credit check or a tenant criminal check.

3. The Government Recommends a Tenant Who Trashes the Property

Government social housing recommend a tenant to a Calgary landlord who was holding an open house for his rental property. He accepted the tenant based on the government’s recommendation.

Months later his property was trashed.

The landlord trusted the government and didn’t conduct his own tenant credit check and tenant criminal check.

The Important of Tenant Screening

What is tenant screening?

It’s looking into a potential tenant’s background and discovering who they ‘really’ are.

The three landlords above trusted either what the tenant told them directly or a ‘recommendation’ from a friend or agency.

Tenant Credit Checks and Tenant Criminal Checks

The days of agreeing to hand over the keys on a handshake or a recommendation are over.

Smart landlords know a tenant credit check and a tenant criminal check don’ t lie.

Tenant credit checks will show you the real details on a prospective renter’s financial past.

Do they pay their bills on time? Do they have creditors after them? Do they have a history of bankruptcies?

Tenant Criminal checks will help you see the background of a potential renter to protect not only your property but other tenants who might share the building.

GARDA Back Screening Solutions

The Alberta Landlords Association is proud to cooperate with GARDA Background Screening Solutions.

GARDA is recognized as the most trusted and leading Canadian owned and operated  provider of background screening solutions.

 GARDA Background Screening Solutions can provide you with the vital information that is required to make informed business decisions.

They will provide you with timely and accurate information to make an informed decision on the risk level of any applicant,

Tenant Screening is more important than ever.

Make tenant credit checks and tenant criminal checks part of your tenant screening process.

Become a professional landlord and make sure you find the great tenants out there!

Calgary Landlord – Freeman Arrested

October 1, 2013

calgary landlord freeman evicted and charged

Calgary Landlord Finally Gets Back To See Her Rental Property

We wrote about the nightmare Calgary landlord Rebekah Caverhill was going through last week.

The good news is she is finally able to enter her rental property and see what’s been done to it.

After all, she hasn’t been able to get in for two years! It’s a story that has reached every outlet in the media including CBC news.

Background Story

A Calgary rental property which was occupied by a man claiming to be a Freeman-on-the-Land was finally vacated Friday last week.

The landlady, Rebekah Caverhill has finally got a look inside the property on Monday. She said her half-duplex unit along Parkdale was overflowing with trash, Freemen manifestos and old computer pieces.

In November 2011, the property was rented by a 48-year-old Sylvan Lake pensioner who calls himself Andreas Pirelli or Mario Antonacci.

He told Caverhill that he was a handyman and was able to convince her to make some unit improvements worth the three month’s rent in return.

Caverhill soon realized the tenant had swapped the house locks and even gutted the kitchen as well as the bathroom.

The man asserted he was a Freeman-on-the-Land taking the property as his embassy.

From a freemen’s point of view they are “sovereign citizens” who are off the hook of the government’s conspiracies and/or restrictions.

Afterwards Caverhill got an invoice of $26,000 for the work accomplished from the tenant’s private company and a notice of $17,000 lien on the property from the Land Titles Office.

A lien is a form of security arranged over to secure any debt or performance payments.

Caverhill shared her horrible story to the media and she was able to secure a court order to throw out the tenant from her property at the end of the week.

Landlady Finally Gets Her Home Back

On Friday last week, the police apprehended the tenant with the warrants issued in Quebec, where in 2007 he allegedly assaulted a former landlady in Montreal.

The tenant still owes over $10,000 for his rent, but he put additional lien on the property instead of paying the landlady.

The Importance of Tenant Screening

What happened to this landlord could happen to any of us. Unless we do proper tenant screening.

Calgary landlords are talking about this, but we all need to be aware of Freeman and their tactics.

The days of a friend’s recommendation or keys and free rent in exchange for repairs to the unit are over.

Alberta landlords protect your family and your investment.

Make sure you screen your tenants well, including credit checks and criminal checks.

Calgary Landlord Regains Control Over Her Rental Property At Last

September 25th, 2013

Bad tenants tenant screening freemen

Landlord said “I can’t handle it, I just can’t. I just want him to leave, get out. That’s all I want.

It appears landlord Rebekah Caverhill’s nightmare is finally over. We’ve seen written about bad tenants before but nothing like this case.

According to a report on CTV News, Freemen-on-the-landlord tenant Andrea Pirelli has been order to get out of his duplex apartment by this coming Saturday.

Pirelli was not in court to hear the judgment but he did have a representative there who refused to provide his name or approach the bench.

CTV News tried yet again to get input from Pirelli and a reporter went to the rental home for the second time in two days to talk to him.

Pirelli came to the window and took our photos but refused to speak.

He calls himself a member of the “Freemen on the Land” movement and believes Canada’s laws don’t apply to him. It’s news that reached landlords all over the country.

Background Story

Rebekah Caverhill rented out half of her Calgary duplex to a man who was recommended as a tenant by a friend. He moved in during November of 2011, but only paid her half of the rent they agreed on. And that’s not the worst part.

The tenant claims to be a ‘Freeman-on-the-Land,’ saying the home is an ‘embassy’ and no longer belongs to Caverhill. He went as far as to change the locks, and do renovations which he then charged Caverhill for…resulting in a lien against her home.

More Details

The tenant told her his name is Andreas Pirelli—which is believed to be an alias. There is a video of him on YouTube under the name Mario Antonacci, where he gives a lesson on what a ‘Sovran Unity Nations Embassy’ is.

Freeman-on-the-Land is a growing movement, that could number as many as 30,000 in Canada. It is also in the United States, where the FBI considers the group a domestic terror threat. ‘Freeman,’ or ‘Sovereign Citizens’ believe that law only governs them if they consent to be governed, and believe they live under ‘natural laws.’ This leads them to avoid taxes, mortgages and utility bills among things.

Caverhill says she’s tried to convict Pirelli to no avail, and police referred her to civil courts, saying it was a landlord-tenant dispute. Police are now talking to Crown to determine if any charges can be laid.

“It may have started out as civil, but this is criminal now,” Caverhill complains. “I have a fraudster, someone trying to take my home.”

Service Alberta is now involved in the case, but Caverhill has been told she needs to get a court order to try and force Pirelli out.

Alberta Landlords and Tenant Screening

This is just another example of why landlords in Calgary and all over Alberta need to make sure you screen your renters carefully.

The days of a simple handshake are over.

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